Locust Grove Estate

Corridor of Commerce

The Locust Grove Estate was purchased by painter and inventor Samuel Morse in 1847, using his profits from the invention of the telegraph. With the help of architect Alexander Jackson Davis, Morse remodeled the house in the Tuscan style, adding a porte cochere, two wings, and a four-story tower. The Morses sold the property to William and Martha Young in 1901 and the Youngs filled the mansion’s 25 rooms with their collections of 18th and 19th century furniture, paintings, silver and porcelain. Conscious of the estate’s importance, the Young’s daughter opened the house to the public in 1979 with her family’s collections intact. The 200 acres of landscaped grounds are set on a sharp bluff overlooking the Hudson River and retain the large flower and kitchen gardens planted and designed by the Youngs. A visitor’s center houses exhibits of Morse’s paintings and telegraph equipment. Walkers can stroll on the carriage roads that wind through the estate grounds.

Amenities: Passport Stamp, Greenway Trail Access, Public Transportation, Restrooms